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Perfectly Pan-seared Pork-chop

January 5, 2010 | Meat & Poultry, Popular, Technique

I’m on a pork kick. Not sure whether it’s because the half hog I got from my farm this year tastes so superior to any store bought meat I’ve ever purchased, or whether the incredible porchetta I had in San Francisco a couple months ago just launched me on this culinary trajectory. Who knows, but I’m hooked on all things pork. Pork shoulder slow cooked then turned into an incredible Green Chili Posole, thick slabs of bacon cooked on baking sheets in the oven and used to top Corn Chowder, or as I promised yesterday, the perfectly pan-seared pork-chop.Let’s get a couple of things straight. Perfectly cooked pork is still slightly pink in the center, cooked to a nice medium, not cooked to shoe leather well done as you might remember it being cooked in the ’60s. If you’re still concerned about diseases, buy your meat from a reputable local source and then enjoy cooking it to the right temperature. My husband thought he hated pork – turns out he just hates overcooked, dry pork. And really, who wouldn’t?Start by patting your chops dry and sprinkling them very liberally with salt and pepper. When the only seasoning to be added is salt and pepper, you want to be sure there is enough of it.Heat your skillet to medium high and add the olive oil. When it’s shimmering hot and not a moment before, add your chops. [Did I forget to put pepper on the second side of these chops or did I just snap the shot before I did?] Sear on one side, without moving them at all, until they are nice and golden brown on the first side, about 3-5 minutes. My chops come bone-in from the farm, and cooking anything bone-in creates the most flavor. I leave the bone and all of the fat while I cook them, then cut the meat from the bone and trim the fat before serving it.Flip and sear the other side until browned. At this point my mom used to cover the pan and let the chops cook all the way through, but I remove them from the heat and let them rest for a few minutes before cutting into them. Not sure how to tell how done a chop or steak is? The pros do it by feel and a steak or chop cooked medium should have a slight resistance when you press on it with your finger but not feel hard and solid. I know that’s hard to envision – it just takes practice.And that, my dear friends, is how you perfectly pan sear a pork chop! Serve it with Homemade Applesaucefor a real treat. You made the applesauce didn’t you?! Promise me you gave it a try!

4.5 from 17 reviews
Perfectly Pan-seared Pork-chop
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Recipe type: Entree
Serves: 2
Ingredients
  • 2 pork chops, preferably bone in
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • olive oil, for searing
Instructions
  1. Pat chops dry and sprinke them very liberally with salt and pepper. Heat your skillet to medium high and add the olive oil. When it's shimmering hot and not a moment before, add your chops. Sear on one side, without moving them at all, until they are nice and golden brown on the first side, about 3-5 minutes. Flip and sear the other side until browned. Remove them from the heat and let them rest, wrapped in foil, for a few minutes before cutting into them.

 

Comments

39 Responses | TrackBack URL | Comments Feed

  1. This is a great post–very informative. I just made pork chops the other night and they turned out pretty well but ever so sligthly overdone. I’m with you…pork should be sligthly pink, otherwise it’s tough.

    Reply

  2. i got a bit dangerous and under cooked it…i also added seasoned salt and paprika to the spices…it was d-lish

    Reply

  3. The USDA changed the cooking guideline for cooking pork from an internal temp of 160 to an internal temp of 145 with a 3 min rest.

    I personally do a minimum of a 5 min rest for any meats, the temp will continue to rise during the rest and it redistributes the juices. Ever wonder why you cut into a steak and your plate is then full of juice? You forget to let it rest!

    Reply

    • hi josh, please don’t ever cook pork to 160! that went out years ago. all the bad stuff is killed at 138. so if you cook it to 140-145, let it rest. you are safe and have moist pork.

      Reply

      • Haha Josh WAS saying that you don’t need to cook it to 160!!!! Read a little more carefully next time ;)

  4. I love this recipe. It was so juicy and flavorful. Thank you. I use to over cook mine.

    Reply

  5. Hi Michele,

    We made the pork chops just as you suggested above. My husband stated that it was in fact THE BEST pork chop he’s ever eaten. We usually shy away from pork because my pork chops tend to be dry.

    Thanks for sharing!

    Tessa

    Reply

  6. thanks, I was unaware that pork no longer needed to be cooked to 160! I look forward to good properly cooked pork chops from now on.

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  7. These were so good and juicy that I didn’t even need any kind of sauce like I normally do with pork chops

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  8. Now I remember that you’ve also purchased a pig. We’ve been in pork heaven here, too. We don’t have chops all that often, but this is pretty similar to the way I cook mine as well. I’m laughing because the whole idea of the lid going over the pan to let them cook through is how my mother taught me to cook them as well. Definitely not a great idea for chops!

    Reply

  9. amazing! I’ve tried on several occasions to sear pork and each time it has turned out dry and leathery. This was perfect! So easy and it was delicious! many thanks.

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  10. Wow! Normally we grill our pork chops as we live in the South, but we ran out of propane – Disaster! I’m 52 years old and never pan seared a pork chop in my life. This was really good. I had two thick cut bone in chops. When done browning, I added some Paula Deen’s bourbon sauce to the top of the chops while they rested. Soooo good. Also tossed some seasoned and marinated zuchinni quarters into the skillet after I flipped them. They were crunchy and cooked perfectly after resting.

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  11. Just used this recipe for my spicy pork chops. Wow!

    Reply

  12. So simple and so good! Just cooked them for the first time tonight and they turned out perfectly! I will play with an apple relish next time!

    Thanks!

    Pete

    Reply

  13. [...] anything extra special I could do to make it even more delicious, and I ended up stumbling across this blog post over at Cooking With [...]

    Reply

  14. Dude… It’s better to be safe than sorry when cooking pork. You can get it to 160 without drying it out.

    Reply

    • Jay, I appreciate your input, but even the USDA has lowered the recommended cooking temperature for pork to 145 degrees. If you buy quality meat, you shouldn’t have any problem at this temp!

      Reply

  15. [...] Perfectly Panseared Pork Chops from cookingwithmichelle.com [...]

    Reply

  16. Absolutely delicious! These were the best pork chops I have ever had. So moist and juicy, no sauce needed this time! Thanks for sharing the tips!

    Reply

  17. All I can say is W O W these were the best porkchops I have ever prepared. I purchased 2 bone-in THICK porkloin chops,came home & googled up this recipe. Must have been my LUCKY day! I only seasoned with salt, pepper, & a tad of garlic powder. Bye bye dry chops….these were a WINNER to our tastebuds. Thanks for sharing the recipe!

    Reply

  18. Thank you so much… best chops ive ever been able to cook myself.
    So moist and juicy…. THANKS again!
    Brett

    Reply

  19. 5 Stars! Used this recipe this morning and made the best pork chops ever!!
    Thank you for sharing.

    Reply

  20. Also add some garlic powder and you will be amazed how it tastes.

    Reply

  21. I’m nervous to cook it slightly pink, but I’m willing to risk possible food sickness if it makes my pork chops any better lol. I understand could temps and I know what your saying is true. but coming from doing it one way for so long it makes me nervous lol.

    Reply

  22. Should I adjust the cooking time for super thick pork chops? Seems like the sear time would be the same due to surface area, but then to make sure they are not too rare, I should maybe do some more cooking……what do you think?

    Reply

    • Laura, if your chops are super thick you might try inserting a meat thermometer into them from the side and cook them to 145 degrees. Or just add a few minutes so they aren’t rare!

      Reply

  23. I personally love the crispy fat and bone to my porkchops. Nothing like scraping a little bit of that delicious marrow out too! :)

    I prefer to buy chops with the bone in, and I never “EVER” overcook the chops! DEEE-licious. Amazing next to toast and an egg in the morning as well!

    Reply

  24. Going to try this.. but instead I’ll cook at a higher heat for less time to sear.. then put the pan into a preheated 375 degree oven covered in peach preserves for 10 minutes. I’ll let you know how it goes.

    Reply

  25. […] so I sought out a delicious looking recipe to do so.  This recipe nailed it.  I relied heavily on this guide to cook the pork chops.  Also, please to admire our new super-giant saute pan, which made fitting […]

    Reply

  26. Great recipe and my family loved the pork chops. Very easy and simple!

    Reply

  27. Turned out wonderful :-).

    Reply

  28. As a college student cooking pork for the first time, this was brilliant! Will make this a lot more!

    Reply

  29. How much olive oil do you use?

    Reply

  30. No wonder my pork chops are always tough and gross!! My meat thermometer says to cook them to 170!!! And I have been!! I’m sharing this with my hubs who is afraid of pink pork chops!! Thank you so much!!

    Reply

  31. OMG…thank you so much for this recipe! This was the best pork chop I’ve ever had in my life! I brined them first for 5 hours and talk about juicy and tender! Now I know how to cook pork chops! :)

    Reply

  32. Tried your recipe for pork chops , one word awesome :)

    Reply

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